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TEKS Number STAARsort descending Student Expectation
G(6)(C)

use orthographic and isometric views of three-dimensional geometric figures to represent and construct three-dimensional geometric figures and solve problems.

G(7)(A)

use one- and two-dimensional coordinate systems to represent points, lines, rays, line segments, and figures;

G(7)(B)

use slopes and equations of lines to investigate geometric relationships, including parallel lines, perpendicular lines, and special segments of triangles and other polygons; and

G(7)(C)

derive and use formulas involving length, slope, and midpoint.

G(8)(A)

find areas of regular polygons, circles, and composite figures;

G(8)(B)

find areas of sectors and arc lengths of circles using proportional reasoning;

G(8)(C)

derive, extend, and use the Pythagorean Theorem; and

G(8)(D)

find surface areas and volumes of prisms, pyramids, spheres, cones, cylinders, and composites of these figures in problem situations.

G(9)(A)

formulate and test conjectures about the properties of parallel and perpendicular lines based on explorations and concrete models;

G(9)(B)

formulate and test conjectures about the properties and attributes of polygons and their component parts based on explorations and concrete models;

G(9)(C)

formulate and test conjectures about the properties and attributes of circles and the lines that intersect them based on explorations and concrete models; and

G(9)(D)

analyze the characteristics of polyhedra and other three-dimensional figures and their component parts based on explorations and concrete models.

G(10)(A)

use congruence transformations to make conjectures and justify properties of geometric figures including figures represented on a coordinate plane; and

G(10)(B)

justify and apply triangle congruence relationships.

G(11)(A)

use and extend similarity properties and transformations to explore and justify conjectures about geometric figures;

G(11)(B)

use ratios to solve problems involving similar figures;

Resource ID Author Select Subject(s) Grade Title
GM5L2 IPSI Mathematics 9–12

Solving Problems with Similar Figures

Given problem situations involving similar figures, the student will use ratios to solve the problems.

G(11)(C)

develop, apply, and justify triangle similarity relationships, such as right triangle ratios, trigonometric ratios, and Pythagorean triples using a variety of methods; and

G(11)(D)

describe the effect on perimeter, area, and volume when one or more dimensions of a figure are changed and apply this idea in solving problems.

P(1)(A)

describe parent functions symbolically and graphically, including f(x) = x to the n power, f(x) = 1n x, f(x) = loga x, f(x) = 1/x, f(x) = e to the x power, f(x) = |x|, f(x) = a to the x power, f(x) = sin x, f(x) = arcsin x, etc.;

P(1)(B)

determine the domain and range of functions using graphs, tables, and symbols;

P(1)(C)

describe symmetry of graphs of even and odd functions;

P(1)(D)

recognize and use connections among significant values of a function (zeros, maximum values, minimum values, etc.), points on the graph of a function, and the symbolic representation of a function; and

P(1)(E)

investigate the concepts of continuity, end behavior, asymptotes, and limits and connect these characteristics to functions represented graphically and numerically.

P(2)(A)

apply basic transformations, including a * f(x), f(x) + d, f(x - c), f(b * x), and compositions with absolute value functions, including |f(x)|, and f(|x|), to the parent functions;

P(2)(B)

perform operations including composition on functions, find inverses, and describe these procedures and results verbally, numerically, symbolically, and graphically; and

P(2)(C)

investigate identities graphically and verify them symbolically, including logarithmic properties, trigonometric identities, and exponential properties.

P(3)(A)

investigate properties of trigonometric and polynomial functions;

P(3)(B)

use functions such as logarithmic, exponential, trigonometric, polynomial, etc. to model real-life data;

P(3)(C)

use regression to determine the appropriateness of a linear function to model real-life data (including using technology to determine the correlation coefficient);

P(3)(D)

use properties of functions to analyze and solve problems and make predictions; and

P(3)(E)

solve problems from physical situations using trigonometry, including the use of Law of Sines, Law of Cosines, and area formulas and incorporate radian measure where needed.

P(4)(A)

represent patterns using arithmetic and geometric sequences and series;

P(4)(B)

use arithmetic, geometric, and other sequences and series to solve real-life problems;

P(4)(C)

describe limits of sequences and apply their properties to investigate convergent and divergent series; and

P(4)(D)

apply sequences and series to solve problems including sums and binomial expansion.

P(5)(A)

use conic sections to model motion, such as the graph of velocity vs. position of a pendulum and motions of planets;

P(5)(B)

use properties of conic sections to describe physical phenomena such as the reflective properties of light and sound;

P(5)(C)

convert between parametric and rectangular forms of functions and equations to graph them; and

P(5)(D)

use parametric functions to simulate problems involving motion.

P(6)(A)

use the concept of vectors to model situations defined by magnitude and direction; and

P(6)(B)

analyze and solve vector problems generated by real-life situations.

M(1)(A)

compare and analyze various methods for solving a real-life problem;

M(1)(B)

use multiple approaches (algebraic, graphical, and geometric methods) to solve problems from a variety of disciplines; and

M(1)(C)

select a method to solve a problem, defend the method, and justify the reasonableness of the results.

M(2)(A)

interpret information from various graphs, including line graphs, bar graphs, circle graphs, histograms, scatterplots, line plots, stem and leaf plots, and box and whisker plots to draw conclusions from the data;

M(2)(B)

analyze numerical data using measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation in order to make inferences;

M(2)(C)

analyze graphs from journals, newspapers, and other sources to determine the validity of stated arguments; and

M(2)(D)

use regression methods available through technology to describe various models for data such as linear, quadratic, exponential, etc., select the most appropriate model, and use the model to interpret information.

M(3)(A)

formulate a meaningful question, determine the data needed to answer the question, gather the appropriate data, analyze the data, and draw reasonable conclusions;

M(3)(B)

communicate methods used, analyses conducted, and conclusions drawn for a data-analysis project by written report, visual display, oral report, or multi-media presentation; and

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