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TEKS Number STAAR Student Expectation
8(F19)(C)

reflect on understanding to monitor comprehension (e.g., summarizing and synthesizing; making textual, personal, and world connections; creating sensory images);

8(F19)(D)

make complex inferences about text and use textual evidence to support understanding;

Resource ID Author Subject Grade Title
E8RdM2L11 IPSI English Language Arts and Reading 8

Imagery and Figurative Language (English 8 Reading)

You will learn how to make complex inferences and use textual evidence such as imagery and figurative language to support understanding.

E8RdM2L9 IPSI English Language Arts and Reading 8

Literary Nonfiction (English 8 Reading)

You will learn how to analyze literary nonfiction, particularly speeches, by making inferences and drawing conclusions based on evidence in the text.

E8RdM2L06 IPSI English Language Arts and Reading 8

Understanding Poetry (English 8 Reading)

You will learn how to find the meanings of words through analogy and other word relationships.

8(F19)(E)

summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize texts in ways that maintain meaning and logical order within a text and across texts; and

Resource ID Author Subject Grade Title
E8RdM3L3 IPSI English Language Arts and Reading 8

Synthesize Ideas in Informational/Expository Text (English 8 Reading)

You will learn how to synthesize and make logical connections between ideas within a text and across two or three texts representing similar or different genres and support with textual evidence.

8(F19)(F)

make intertextual links among and across texts, including other media (e.g., film, play), and provide textual evidence.

Resource ID Author Subject Grade Title
E8RdM4L1 IPSI English Language Arts and Reading 8

Find Connections Across Texts Including Other Media (English 8 Reading)

You will learn how to evaluate the role of media in focusing attention on events and informing opinions on issues as well as techniques used to create point of view, and how this impacts the audience.

10(A)

identify the purposes of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution, including the Bill of Rights; and

10(B)

describe and explain the importance of the concept of 'consent of the governed' as it relates to the functions of local, state, and national government.

1(1)

The desire to achieve educational excellence is the driving force behind the Texas essential knowledge and skills for mathematics, guided by the college and career readiness standards. By embedding statistics, probability, and finance, while focusing on computational thinking, mathematical fluency, and solid understanding, Texas will lead the way in mathematics education and prepare all Texas students for the challenges they will face in the 21st century.

1(1)(A)

recognize that spoken words are represented in written English by specific sequences of letters;

1(1)(A)

recognize and demonstrate safe practices as described in the Texas Safety Standards during classroom and outdoor investigations, including wearing safety goggles, washing hands, and using materials appropriately;

1(1)(A)

describe the origins of customs, holidays, and celebrations of the community, state, and nation such as San Jacinto Day, Independence Day, and Veterans Day; and

1(1)(A)

apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace

1(1)(B)

identify upper- and lower-case letters;

1(1)(B)

recognize the importance of safe practices to keep self and others safe and healthy; and

1(1)(B)

compare the observance of holidays and celebrations, past and present.

1(1)(B)

use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution

1(1)(C)

sequence the letters of the alphabet;

1(1)(C)

identify and learn how to use natural resources and materials, including conservation and reuse or recycling of paper, plastic, and metals.

1(1)(C)

select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems

1(1)(D)

recognize the distinguishing features of a sentence (e.g., capitalization of first word, ending punctuation);

1(1)(D)

communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations, including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate

1(1)(E)

read texts by moving from top to bottom of the page and tracking words from left to right with return sweep; and

1(1)(E)

create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical ideas

1(1)(F)

identify the information that different parts of a book provide (e.g., title, author, illustrator, table of contents).

1(1)(F)

analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas

1(1)(G)

display, explain, and justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication

1(2)

The process standards describe ways in which students are expected to engage in the content. The placement of the process standards at the beginning of the knowledge and skills listed for each grade and course is intentional. The process standards weave the other knowledge and skills together so that students may be successful problem solvers and use mathematics efficiently and effectively in daily life. The process standards are integrated at every grade level and course. When possible, students will apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace. Students will use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution. Students will select appropriate tools such as real objects, manipulatives, algorithms, paper and pencil, and technology and techniques such as mental math, estimation, number sense, and generalization and abstraction to solve problems. Students will effectively communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations such as symbols, diagrams, graphs, computer programs, and language. Students will use mathematical relationships to generate solutions and make connections and predictions. Students will analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas. Students will display, explain, or justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.

1(2)(A)

orally generate a series of original rhyming words using a variety of phonograms (e.g., -ake, -ant, -ain) and consonant blends (e.g., bl, st, tr);

1(2)(A)

ask questions about organisms, objects, and events observed in the natural world;

1(2)(A)

identify contributions of historical figures, including Sam Houston, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Martin Luther King Jr., who have influenced the community, state, and nation;

1(2)(A)

recognize instantly the quantity of structured arrangements

1(2)(B)

distinguish between long- and short-vowel sounds in spoken one-syllable words (e.g., bit/bite);

1(2)(B)

plan and conduct simple descriptive investigations such as ways objects move;

1(2)(B)

identify historical figures such as Alexander Graham Bell, Thomas Edison, Garrett Morgan, and Richard Allen, and other individuals who have exhibited individualism and inventiveness; and

1(2)(B)

use concrete and pictorial models to compose and decompose numbers up to 120 in more than one way as so many hundreds, so many tens, and so many ones

1(2)(C)

recognize the change in a spoken word when a specified phoneme is added, changed, or removed (e.g., /b/l/o/w/ to /g/l/o/w/);

1(2)(C)

collect data and make observations using simple equipment such as hand lenses, primary balances, and non-standard measurement tools;

1(2)(C)

compare the similarities and differences among the lives and activities of historical figures and other individuals who have influenced the community, state, and nation.

1(2)(C)

use objects, pictures, and expanded and standard forms to represent numbers up to 120

1(2)(D)

blend spoken phonemes to form one- and two-syllable words, including consonant blends (e.g., spr);

1(2)(D)

record and organize data using pictures, numbers, and words; and

1(2)(D)

generate a number that is greater than or less than a given whole number up to 120

1(2)(E)

isolate initial, medial, and final sounds in one-syllable spoken words; and

1(2)(E)

communicate observations and provide reasons for explanations using student-generated data from simple descriptive investigations.

1(2)(E)

use place value to compare whole numbers up to 120 using comparative language

1(2)(F)

segment spoken one-syllable words of three to five phonemes into individual phonemes (e.g., splat = /s/p/l/a/t/).

1(2)(F)

order whole numbers up to 120 using place value and open number lines

1(2)(G)

represent the comparison of two numbers to 100 using the symbols >,

1(3)

For students to become fluent in mathematics, students must develop a robust sense of number. The National Research Council's report, "Adding It Up," defines procedural fluency as "skill in carrying out procedures flexibly, accurately, efficiently, and appropriately." As students develop procedural fluency, they must also realize that true problem solving may take time, effort, and perseverance. Students in Grade 1 are expected to perform their work without the use of calculators.

1(3)(A)

decode words in context and in isolation by applying common letter-sound correspondences, including:

1(3)(A)

identify and explain a problem such as finding a home for a classroom pet and propose a solution in his/her own words;

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