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TEKS Number STAAR Student Expectation
1(3)(A)

distinguish among past, present, and future;

1(3)(A)

use concrete and pictorial models to determine the sum of a multiple of 10 and a one-digit number in problems up to 99

1(3)(A)(i)

decode words in context and in isolation by applying common letter-sound correspondences, including: single letters (consonants) including b, c=/k/, c=/s/, d, f, g=/g/ (hard), g=/j/ (soft), h, j, k, l, m, n, p, qu=/kw/, r, s=/s/, s=/z/, t, v, w, x=/ks/, y, and z;

1(3)(A)(ii)

decode words in context and in isolation by applying common letter-sound correspondences, including: single letters (vowels) including short a, short e, short i, short o, short u, long a (a-e), long e (e), long i (i-e), long o (o-e), long u (u-e), y=long e, and y=long i;

1(3)(A)(iii)

decode words in context and in isolation by applying common letter-sound correspondences, including: consonant blends (e.g., bl, st);

1(3)(A)(iv)

decode words in context and in isolation by applying common letter-sound correspondences, including: consonant digraphs including ch, tch, sh, th=as in thing, wh, ng, ck, kn, -dge, and ph;

1(3)(A)(v)

decode words in context and in isolation by applying common letter-sound correspondences, including: vowel digraphs including oo as in foot, oo as in moon, ea as in eat, ea as in bread, ee, ow as in how, ow as in snow, ou as in out, ay, ai, aw, au, ew, oa, ie as in chief, ie as in pie, and -igh; and

1(3)(A)(vi)

decode words in context and in isolation by applying common letter-sound correspondences, including: vowel diphthongs including oy, oi, ou, and ow;

1(3)(B)

combine sounds from letters and common spelling patterns (e.g., consonant blends, long- and short-vowel patterns) to create recognizable words;

1(3)(B)

make predictions based on observable patterns; and

1(3)(B)

describe and measure calendar time by days, weeks, months, and years; and

1(3)(B)

use objects and pictorial models to solve word problems involving joining, separating, and comparing sets within 20 and unknowns as any one of the terms in the problem such as 2 + 4 = [ ]; 3 + [ ] = 7; and 5 = [ ] - 3

1(3)(C)

use common syllabication patterns to decode words, including:

1(3)(C)

describe what scientists do.

1(3)(C)

create a calendar and simple timeline.

1(3)(C)

compose 10 with two or more addends with and without concrete objects

1(3)(C)(i)

use common syllabication patterns to decode words, including: closed syllable (CVC) (e.g., mat, rab-bit);

1(3)(C)(ii)

use common syllabication patterns to decode words, including: open syllable (CV) (e.g., he, ba-by);

1(3)(C)(iii)

use common syllabication patterns to decode words, including: final stable syllable (e.g., ap-ple, a-ble);

1(3)(C)(iv)

use common syllabication patterns to decode words, including: vowel-consonant-silent 'e' words (VCe) (e.g., kite, hide);

1(3)(C)(v)

use common syllabication patterns to decode words, including: vowel digraphs and diphthongs (e.g., boy-hood, oat-meal); and

1(3)(C)(vi)

use common syllabication patterns to decode words, including: r-controlled vowel sounds (e.g., tar); including er, ir, ur, ar, and or;

1(3)(D)

decode words with common spelling patterns (e.g., -ink, -onk, -ick);

1(3)(D)

apply basic fact strategies to add and subtract within 20, including making 10 and decomposing a number leading to a 10

1(3)(E)

read base words with inflectional endings (e.g., plurals, past tenses);

1(3)(E)

explain strategies used to solve addition and subtraction problems up to 20 using spoken words, objects, pictorial models, and number sentences

1(3)(F)

use knowledge of the meaning of base words to identify and read common compound words (e.g., football, popcorn, daydream);

1(3)(F)

generate and solve problem situations when given a number sentence involving addition or subtraction of numbers within 20

1(3)(G)

identify and read contractions (e.g., isn't, can't);

1(3)(H)

identify and read at least 100 high-frequency words from a commonly used list; and

1(3)(I)

monitor accuracy of decoding.

1(4)

The primary focal areas in Grade 1 are understanding and applying place value, solving problems involving addition and subtraction, and composing and decomposing two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional solids.

1(4)(A)

confirm predictions about what will happen next in text by 'reading the part that tells';

1(4)(A)

collect, record, and compare information using tools, including computers, hand lenses, primary balances, cups, bowls, magnets, collecting nets, notebooks, and safety goggles; timing devices, including clocks and timers; non-standard measuring items such as paper clips and clothespins; weather instruments such as classroom demonstration thermometers and wind socks; and materials to support observations of habitats of organisms such as aquariums and terrariums; and

1(4)(A)

locate places using the four cardinal directions; and

1(4)(A)

identify U.S. coins, including pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters, by value and describe the relationships among them

1(4)(A)

Students use relationships within the numeration system to understand the sequential order of the counting numbers and their relative magnitude.

1(4)(B)

ask relevant questions, seek clarification, and locate facts and details about stories and other texts; and

1(4)(B)

measure and compare organisms and objects using non-standard units.

1(4)(B)

describe the location of self and objects relative to other locations in the classroom and school.

1(4)(B)

write a number with the cent symbol to describe the value of a coin

1(4)(B)

Students extend their use of addition and subtraction beyond the actions of joining and separating to include comparing and combining. Students use properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction to solve problems. By comparing a variety of solution strategies, students use efficient, accurate, and generalizable methods to perform operations.

1(4)(C)

establish purpose for reading selected texts and monitor comprehension, making corrections and adjustments when that understanding breaks down (e.g., identifying clues, using background knowledge, generating questions, re-reading a portion aloud).

1(4)(C)

use relationships to count by twos, fives, and tens to determine the value of a collection of pennies, nickels, and/or dimes

1(4)(C)

Students use basic shapes and spatial reasoning to model objects in their environment and construct more complex shapes. Students are able to identify, name, and describe basic two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional solids.

1(5)

Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to read aloud grade-level appropriate text with fluency (rate, accuracy, expression, appropriate phrasing) and comprehension.

1(5)

Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

1(5)(A)

classify objects by observable properties of the materials from which they are made such as larger and smaller, heavier and lighter, shape, color, and texture; and

1(5)(A)

create and use simple maps such as maps of the home, classroom, school, and community; and

1(5)(A)

recite numbers forward and backward from any given number between 1 and 120

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