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TEKS Number STAAR Student Expectation
1(5)(B)

predict and identify changes in materials caused by heating and cooling such as ice melting, water freezing, and water evaporating.

1(5)(B)

locate the community, Texas, and the United States on maps and globes.

1(5)(B)

skip count by twos, fives, and tens to determine the total number of objects up to 120 in a set

1(5)(C)

use relationships to determine the number that is 10 more and 10 less than a given number up to 120

1(5)(D)

represent word problems involving addition and subtraction of whole numbers up to 20 using concrete and pictorial models and number sentences

1(5)(E)

understand that the equal sign represents a relationship where expressions on each side of the equal sign represent the same value(s)

1(5)(F)

determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation when the unknown may be any one of the three or four terms in the equation

1(5)(G)

apply properties of operations to add and subtract two or three numbers

Resource ID Author Subject Grade Title
TEKS12_MATH_01_001 ESC13 Mathematics 1

Making Ten and Applying Properties of Operations

In these activities students will explore and identify patterns in related addition and subtractions number sentences.

1(6)(A)

identify words that name actions (verbs) and words that name persons, places, or things (nouns);

1(6)(A)

identify and discuss how different forms of energy such as light, heat, and sound are important to everyday life;

Resource ID Author Subject Grade Title
K4SCI001 r4projectshare Science 1

Energy in Everyday Life

This resource provides sample activities for teachers to use in helping students to identify and discuss how different forms of energy such as light, heat, and sound are important to everyday life.

1(6)(A)

identify and describe the physical characteristics of places such as landforms, bodies of water, natural resources, and weather;

1(6)(A)

classify and sort regular and irregular two-dimensional shapes based on attributes using informal geometric language

1(6)(B)

determine the meaning of compound words using knowledge of the meaning of their individual component words (e.g., lunchtime);

1(6)(B)

predict and describe how a magnet can be used to push or pull an object;

1(6)(B)

identify examples of and uses for natural resources in the community, state, and nation; and

1(6)(B)

distinguish between attributes that define a two-dimensional or three-dimensional figure and attributes that do not define the shape

1(6)(C)

determine what words mean from how they are used in a sentence, either heard or read;

1(6)(C)

describe the change in the location of an object such as closer to, nearer to, and farther from; and

1(6)(C)

identify and describe how the human characteristics of place such as shelter, clothing, food, and activities are based upon geographic location.

1(6)(C)

create two-dimensional figures, including circles, triangles, rectangles, and squares, as special rectangles, rhombuses, and hexagons

1(6)(D)

identify and sort words into conceptual categories (e.g., opposites, living things); and

1(6)(D)

demonstrate and record the ways that objects can move such as in a straight line, zig zag, up and down, back and forth, round and round, and fast and slow.

1(6)(D)

identify two-dimensional shapes, including circles, triangles, rectangles, and squares, as special rectangles, rhombuses, and hexagons and describe their attributes using formal geometric language

1(6)(E)

alphabetize a series of words to the first or second letter and use a dictionary to find words.

1(6)(E)

identify three-dimensional solids, including spheres, cones, cylinders, rectangular prisms (including cubes), and triangular prisms, and describe their attributes using formal geometric language

1(6)(F)

compose two-dimensional shapes by joining two, three, or four figures to produce a target shape in more than one way if possible

1(6)(G)

partition two-dimensional figures into two and four fair shares or equal parts and describe the parts using words

1(6)(H)

identify examples and non-examples of halves and fourths

1(7)(A)

connect the meaning of a well-known story or fable to personal experiences; and

1(7)(A)

observe, compare, describe, and sort components of soil by size, texture, and color;

Resource ID Author Subject Grade Title
R4SCI0026 r4projectshare Science 1

Soil

A Tier 1 earth science instructional resource for grade 1.

1(7)(A)

describe ways that families meet basic human needs; and

1(7)(A)

use measuring tools to measure the length of objects to reinforce the continuous nature of linear measurement

1(7)(B)

explain the function of recurring phrases (e.g., 'Once upon a time' or 'They lived happily ever after') in traditional folk- and fairy tales.

1(7)(B)

identify and describe a variety of natural sources of water, including streams, lakes, and oceans; and

1(7)(B)

describe similarities and differences in ways families meet basic human needs.

1(7)(B)

illustrate that the length of an object is the number of same-size units of length that, when laid end-to-end with no gaps or overlaps, reach from one end of the object to the other

1(7)(C)

gather evidence of how rocks, soil, and water help to make useful products.

1(7)(C)

measure the same object/distance with units of two different lengths and describe how and why the measurements differ

1(7)(D)

describe a length to the nearest whole unit using a number and a unit

1(7)(E)

tell time to the hour and half hour using analog and digital clocks

1(8)

Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to respond to and use rhythm, rhyme, and alliteration in poetry.

1(8)(A)

record weather information, including relative temperature, such as hot or cold, clear or cloudy, calm or windy, and rainy or icy;

1(8)(A)

identify examples of goods and services in the home, school, and community;

1(8)(A)

collect, sort, and organize data in up to three categories using models/representations such as tally marks or T-charts

1(8)(B)

observe and record changes in the appearance of objects in the sky such as clouds, the Moon, and stars, including the Sun;

1(8)(B)

identify ways people exchange goods and services; and

1(8)(B)

use data to create picture and bar-type graphs

1(8)(C)

identify characteristics of the seasons of the year and day and night; and

1(8)(C)

identify the role of markets in the exchange of goods and services.

1(8)(C)

draw conclusions and generate and answer questions using information from picture and bar-type graphs

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