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TEKS Number STAAR Student Expectation
2(2)(D)

record and organize data using pictures, numbers, and words;

2(2)(D)

use place value to compare and order whole numbers up to 1,200 using comparative language, numbers, and symbols (>,

2(2)(E)

identify and read abbreviations (e.g., Mr., Ave.);

2(2)(E)

communicate observations and justify explanations using student-generated data from simple descriptive investigations; and

2(2)(E)

locate the position of a given whole number on an open number line

2(2)(F)

identify and read contractions (e.g., haven't, it's);

2(2)(F)

compare results of investigations with what students and scientists know about the world.

2(2)(F)

name the whole number that corresponds to a specific point on a number line

2(2)(G)

identify and read at least 300 high-frequency words from a commonly used list; and

2(2)(H)

monitor accuracy of decoding.

2(3)(A)

use ideas (e.g., illustrations, titles, topic sentences, key words, and foreshadowing) to make and confirm predictions;

2(3)(A)

identify and explain a problem in his/her own words and propose a task and solution for the problem such as lack of water in a habitat;

2(3)(A)

identify several sources of information about a given period or event such as reference materials, biographies, newspapers, and electronic sources; and

2(3)(A)

partition objects into equal parts and name the parts, including halves, fourths, and eighths, using words

2(3)(B)

ask relevant questions, seek clarification, and locate facts and details about stories and other texts and support answers with evidence from text; and

2(3)(B)

make predictions based on observable patterns; and

2(3)(B)

describe various evidence of the same time period using primary sources such as photographs, journals, and interviews.

2(3)(B)

explain that the more fractional parts used to make a whole, the smaller the part; and the fewer the fractional parts, the larger the part

2(3)(C)

establish purpose for reading selected texts and monitor comprehension, making corrections and adjustments when that understanding breaks down (e.g., identifying clues, using background knowledge, generating questions, re-reading a portion aloud).

2(3)(C)

identify what a scientist is and explore what different scientists do.

2(3)(C)

use concrete models to count fractional parts beyond one whole using words and recognize how many parts it takes to equal one whole

2(3)(D)

identify examples and non-examples of halves, fourths, and eighths

2(4)

Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to read aloud grade-level appropriate text with fluency (rate, accuracy, expression, appropriate phrasing) and comprehension.

2(4)(A)

collect, record, and compare information using tools, including computers, hand lenses, rulers, primary balances, plastic beakers, magnets, collecting nets, notebooks, and safety goggles; timing devices, including clocks and stopwatches; weather instruments such as thermometers, wind vanes, and rain gauges; and materials to support observations of habitats of organisms such as terrariums and aquariums; and

2(4)(A)

identify contributions of historical figures, including Thurgood Marshall, Irma Rangel, John Hancock, and Theodore Roosevelt, who have influenced the community, state, and nation;

2(4)(A)

recall basic facts to add and subtract within 20 with automaticity

2(4)(B)

measure and compare organisms and objects using non-standard units that approximate metric units.

2(4)(B)

identify historical figures such as Amelia Earhart, W. E. B. DuBois, Robert Fulton, and George Washington Carver who have exhibited individualism and inventiveness; and

2(4)(B)

add up to four two-digit numbers and subtract two-digit numbers using mental strategies and algorithms based on knowledge of place value and properties of operations

2(4)(C)

explain how people and events have influenced local community history.

2(4)(C)

solve one-step and multi-step word problems involving addition and subtraction within 1,000 using a variety of strategies based on place value, including algorithms

2(4)(D)

generate and solve problem situations for a given mathematical number sentence involving addition and subtraction of whole numbers within 1,000

Resource ID Author Subject Grade Title
TEKS12_MATH_02_001 ESC13 Mathematics 2

Modeling Addition and Subtraction of Two-Digit Numbers

In this activity students will model addition and subtraction of two-digit numbers.

2(5)(A)

use prefixes and suffixes to determine the meaning of words (e.g., allow/disallow);

2(5)(A)

classify matter by physical properties, including shape, relative mass, relative temperature, texture, flexibility, and whether material is a solid or liquid;

2(5)(A)

interpret information on maps and globes using basic map elements such as title, orientation (north, south, east, west), and legend/map keys; and

2(5)(A)

determine the value of a collection of coins up to one dollar

2(5)(B)

use context to determine the relevant meaning of unfamiliar words or multiple-meaning words;

2(5)(B)

compare changes in materials caused by heating and cooling;

2(5)(B)

create maps to show places and routes within the home, school, and community.

2(5)(B)

use the cent symbol, dollar sign, and the decimal point to name the value of a collection of coins

2(5)(C)

identify and use common words that are opposite (antonyms) or similar (synonyms) in meaning; and

2(5)(C)

demonstrate that things can be done to materials to change their physical properties such as cutting, folding, sanding, and melting; and

2(5)(D)

alphabetize a series of words and use a dictionary or a glossary to find words.

2(5)(D)

combine materials that when put together can do things that they cannot do by themselves such as building a tower or a bridge and justify the selection of those materials based on their physical properties.

2(6)(A)

identify moral lessons as themes in well-known fables, legends, myths, or stories; and

2(6)(A)

investigate the effects on an object by increasing or decreasing amounts of light, heat, and sound energy such as how the color of an object appears different in dimmer light or how heat melts butter;

Resource ID Author Subject Grade Title
K4SCI002 r4projectshare Science 2

Increasing and Decreasing Energy

This resource provides sample activities for teachers to use in helping students to identify and investigate the effects of increasing and decreasing amounts of light, heat, and sound energy on an object.

2(6)(A)

identify major landforms and bodies of water, including each of the continents and each of the oceans, on maps and globes;

2(6)(A)

model, create, and describe contextual multiplication situations in which equivalent sets of concrete objects are joined

2(6)(B)

compare different versions of the same story in traditional and contemporary folktales with respect to their characters, settings, and plot.

2(6)(B)

observe and identify how magnets are used in everyday life;

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