Search TEKS

TEKS Number STAAR Student Expectation
3(1)(A)(iv)

decode multisyllabic words in context and independent of context by applying common spelling patterns including: using knowledge of common prefixes and suffixes (e.g., dis-, -ly); and

3(1)(A)(v)

decode multisyllabic words in context and independent of context by applying common spelling patterns including: using knowledge of derivational affixes (e.g., -de, -ful, -able);

3(1)(B)

use common syllabication patterns to decode words including:

3(1)(B)

make informed choices in the use and conservation of natural resources by recycling or reusing materials such as paper, aluminum cans, and plastics.

3(1)(B)

identify individuals, including Pierre-Charles L'Enfant, Benjamin Banneker, and Benjamin Franklin, who have helped to shape communities; and

3(1)(B)

use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution

3(1)(B)(i)

use common syllabication patterns to decode words including: closed syllable (CVC) (e.g., mag-net, splen-did);

3(1)(B)(ii)

use common syllabication patterns to decode words including: open syllable (CV) (e.g., ve-to);

3(1)(B)(iii)

use common syllabication patterns to decode words including: final stable syllable (e.g., puz-zle, con-trac-tion);

3(1)(B)(iv)

use common syllabication patterns to decode words including: r-controlled vowels (e.g., fer-ment, car-pool); and

3(1)(B)(v)

use common syllabication patterns to decode words including: vowel digraphs and diphthongs (e.g., ei-ther);

3(1)(C)

decode words applying knowledge of common spelling patterns (e.g., -eigh, -ought);

3(1)(C)

describe how individuals, including Daniel Boone, Christopher Columbus, the Founding Fathers, and Juan de Oñate, have contributed to the expansion of existing communities or to the creation of new communities.

3(1)(C)

select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems

3(1)(D)

identify and read contractions (e.g., I'd, won't); and

3(1)(D)

communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations, including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate

3(1)(E)

monitor accuracy in decoding.

3(1)(E)

create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical ideas

3(1)(F)

analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas

3(1)(G)

display, explain, and justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication

3(2)(A)

use ideas (e.g., illustrations, titles, topic sentences, key words, and foreshadowing clues) to make and confirm predictions;

3(2)(A)

plan and implement descriptive investigations, including asking and answering questions, making inferences, and selecting and using equipment or technology needed, to solve a specific problem in the natural world;

3(2)(A)

identify reasons people have formed communities, including a need for security, religious freedom, law, and material well-being;

3(2)(A)

compose and decompose numbers up to 100,000 as a sum of so many ten thousands, so many thousands, so many hundreds, so many tens, and so many ones using objects, pictorial models, and numbers, including expanded notation as appropriate

3(2)(B)

ask relevant questions, seek clarification, and locate facts and details about stories and other texts and support answers with evidence from text; and

3(2)(B)

collect data by observing and measuring using the metric system and recognize differences between observed and measured data;

3(2)(B)

identify ways in which people in the local community and other communities meet their needs for government, education, communication, transportation, and recreation; and

3(2)(B)

describe the mathematical relationships found in the base-10 place value system through the hundred thousands place

3(2)(C)

establish purpose for reading selected texts and monitor comprehension, making corrections and adjustments when that understanding breaks down (e.g., identifying clues, using background knowledge, generating questions, re-reading a portion aloud).

3(2)(C)

construct maps, graphic organizers, simple tables, charts, and bar graphs using tools and current technology to organize, examine, and evaluate measured data;

3(2)(C)

compare ways in which various other communities meet their needs.

3(2)(C)

represent a number on a number line as being between two consecutive multiples of 10; 100; 1,000; or 10,000 and use words to describe relative size of numbers in order to round whole numbers

3(2)(D)

analyze and interpret patterns in data to construct reasonable explanations based on evidence from investigations;

3(2)(D)

compare and order whole numbers up to 100,000 and represent comparisons using the symbols >,

3(2)(E)

demonstrate that repeated investigations may increase the reliability of results; and

3(2)(F)

communicate valid conclusions supported by data in writing, by drawing pictures, and through verbal discussion.

3(3)

Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to read aloud grade-level appropriate text with fluency (rate, accuracy, expression, appropriate phrasing) and comprehension.

3(3)(A)

in all fields of science, analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning, and experimental and observational testing, including examining all sides of scientific evidence of those scientific explanations, so as to encourage critical thinking by the student;

3(3)(A)

use vocabulary related to chronology, including past, present, and future times;

3(3)(A)

represent fractions greater than zero and less than or equal to one with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 using concrete objects and pictorial models, including strip diagrams and number lines

3(3)(B)

draw inferences and evaluate accuracy of product claims found in advertisements and labels such as for toys and food;

3(3)(B)

create and interpret timelines; and

3(3)(B)

determine the corresponding fraction greater than zero and less than or equal to one with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 given a specified point on a number line

3(3)(C)

represent the natural world using models such as volcanoes or Sun, Earth, and Moon system and identify their limitations, including size, properties, and materials; and

3(3)(C)

apply the terms year, decade, and century to describe historical times.

3(3)(C)

explain that the unit fraction 1/b represents the quantity formed by one part of a whole that has been partitioned into b equal parts where b is a non-zero whole number

3(3)(D)

connect grade-level appropriate science concepts with the history of science, science careers, and contributions of scientists.

3(3)(D)

compose and decompose a fraction a/b with a numerator greater than zero and less than or equal to b as a sum of parts 1/b

3(3)(E)

solve problems involving partitioning an object or a set of objects among two or more recipients using pictorial representations of fractions with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8

3(3)(F)

represent equivalent fractions with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 using a variety of objects and pictorial models, including number lines

Pages