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TEKS Number STAAR Student Expectation
3(4)(C)

describe the effects of physical processes such as volcanoes, hurricanes, and earthquakes in shaping the landscape;

3(4)(C)

determine the value of a collection of coins and bills

3(4)(D)

identify and apply playful uses of language (e.g., tongue twisters, palindromes, riddles); and

3(4)(D)

describe the effects of human processes such as building new homes, conservation, and pollution in shaping the landscape; and

3(4)(D)

determine the total number of objects when equally-sized groups of objects are combined or arranged in arrays up to 10 by 10

3(4)(E)

alphabetize a series of words to the third letter and use a dictionary or a glossary to determine the meanings, syllabication, and pronunciation of unknown words.

3(4)(E)

identify and compare the human characteristics of various regions.

3(4)(E)

represent multiplication facts by using a variety of approaches such as repeated addition, equal-sized groups, arrays, area models, equal jumps on a number line, and skip counting

3(4)(F)

recall facts to multiply up to 10 by 10 with automaticity and recall the corresponding division facts

3(4)(G)

use strategies and algorithms, including the standard algorithm, to multiply a two-digit number by a one-digit number. Strategies may include mental math, partial products, and the commutative, associative, and distributive properties

3(4)(H)

determine the number of objects in each group when a set of objects is partitioned into equal shares or a set of objects is shared equally

3(4)(I)

determine if a number is even or odd using divisibility rules

3(4)(J)

determine a quotient using the relationship between multiplication and division

3(4)(K)

solve one-step and two-step problems involving multiplication and division within 100 using strategies based on objects; pictorial models, including arrays, area models, and equal groups; properties of operations; or recall of facts

3(5)(A)

paraphrase the themes and supporting details of fables, legends, myths, or stories; and

3(5)(A)

measure, test, and record physical properties of matter, including temperature, mass, magnetism, and the ability to sink or float;

3(5)(A)

use cardinal and intermediate directions to locate places on maps and globes such as the Rocky Mountains, the Mississippi River, and Austin, Texas, in relation to the local community;

3(5)(A)

represent one- and two-step problems involving addition and subtraction of whole numbers to 1,000 using pictorial models, number lines, and equations

3(5)(B)

compare and contrast the settings in myths and traditional folktales.

3(5)(B)

describe and classify samples of matter as solids, liquids, and gases and demonstrate that solids have a definite shape and that liquids and gases take the shape of their container;

3(5)(B)

use a scale to determine the distance between places on maps and globes;

3(5)(B)

represent and solve one- and two-step multiplication and division problems within 100 using arrays, strip diagrams, and equations

3(5)(C)

predict, observe, and record changes in the state of matter caused by heating or cooling; and

Resource ID Author Select Subject(s) Grade Title
R4SCI0040 r4projectshare Science 3

Heating and Cooling

A Tier 1 physical science instructional resource for grade 3.

3(5)(C)

identify and use the compass rose, grid system, and symbols to locate places on maps and globes; and

3(5)(C)

describe a multiplication expression as a comparison such as 3 x 24 represents 3 times as much as 24

3(5)(D)

explore and recognize that a mixture is created when two materials are combined such as gravel and sand and metal and plastic paper clips.

3(5)(D)

create and interpret maps of places and regions that contain map elements, including a title, compass rose, legend, scale, and grid system.

3(5)(D)

determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers when the unknown is either a missing factor or product

3(5)(E)

represent real-world relationships using number pairs in a table and verbal descriptions

3(6)

Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to describe the characteristics of various forms of poetry and how they create imagery (e.g., narrative poetry, lyrical poetry, humorous poetry, free verse).

3(6)(A)

explore different forms of energy, including mechanical, light, sound, and heat/thermal in everyday life;

3(6)(A)

identify ways of earning, spending, saving, and donating money; and

3(6)(A)

classify and sort two- and three-dimensional solids, including cones, cylinders, spheres, triangular and rectangular prisms, and cubes, based on attributes using formal geometric language

3(6)(B)

demonstrate and observe how position and motion can be changed by pushing and pulling objects to show work being done such as swings, balls, pulleys, and wagons; and

3(6)(B)

create a simple budget that allocates money for spending, saving, and donating.

3(6)(B)

use attributes to recognize rhombuses, parallelograms, trapezoids, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories

3(6)(C)

observe forces such as magnetism and gravity acting on objects.

3(6)(C)

determine the area of rectangles with whole number side lengths in problems using multiplication related to the number of rows times the number of unit squares in each row

3(6)(D)

decompose composite figures formed by rectangles into non-overlapping rectangles to determine the area of the original figure using the additive property of area

3(6)(E)

decompose two congruent two-dimensional figures into parts with equal areas and express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole and recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape

3(7)

Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the elements of plot and character as presented through dialogue in scripts that are read, viewed, written, or performed.

3(7)(A)

explore and record how soils are formed by weathering of rock and the decomposition of plant and animal remains;

Resource ID Author Select Subject(s) Grade Title
R4SCI0025 r4projectshare Science 3

Weathering and Decomposition

A Tier 1 earth science instructional resource for grade 3.

3(7)(A)

define and identify examples of scarcity;

3(7)(A)

represent fractions of halves, fourths, and eighths as distances from zero on a number line

3(7)(B)

investigate rapid changes in Earth's surface such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and landslides;

3(7)(B)

explain the impact of scarcity on the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services;

3(7)(B)

determine the perimeter of a polygon or a missing length when given perimeter and remaining side lengths in problems

3(7)(C)

identify and compare different landforms, including mountains, hills, valleys, and plains; and

3(7)(C)

explain the concept of a free market as it relates to the U.S. free enterprise system.

3(7)(C)

determine the solutions to problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes using pictorial models or tools such as a 15-minute event plus a 30-minute event equals 45 minutes

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